Webinars Delivered by GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED Board Members of the LSINJ


(I) WEBINAR SCHEDULE: 2019 - 2021

AllWebinarSchdls.Rvsd.05.11.2020.xlsx

(II) WEBINAR SCHEDULE 2021 - 2022 cycle of Webinars and Meetings (monthly webinars and trimonthly Administrative Meetings)


LSINJ - Web/Mtng.Schedule: 2021 - 2022

(I) WEBINARS 2019 - 2021

(1) Prof. George Perry, PhD; Webinar March 10th 2019

Dean Emeritus & Professor, Department of Biology and Chemistry, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA

Title: In search of a therapy for Alzheimer’s disease

Abstract

For nearly four decades of our research has focused on dissecting the cytopathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with the goal of developing a cure. We have used oxidative stress as a window to view and understand AD. Oxidative damage to sugars, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids is increased in neuronal cytoplasm. The same neuronal compartment has increased redox-active iron and copper, that can catalyze oxidative damage, that likely derive from mitochondrial debris (in and outside lysosomes) including cytochromes, mitochondria specific prosthetic groups and mtDNA. Mitochondria show altered axonal transport, size distribution, energetics, fusion/fission, and degradation in AD that correlate with the extent of oxidative damage suggesting they are the origin. Surprisingly, amyloidβ and tau are quantitatively associated with reduced neuronal oxidative damage. Copper sequestration by amyloidβ blocks copper mediated oxidation of lipids and vitamin C indicating amyloidβcan be a protective response rather than the initiator of AD. Instead of being bound to amyloidβ, iron is present as 10nm magnetite crystals with super paramagnetic properties. Not just amyloidβ, but also tau, stress responses and activation of glutathione production are protective responses induced in AD to maintain neurons with altered balance for decades. While these studies put oxidative stress at the center of AD, they also highlight a complexity of multifaceted alterations that is homeostatic and requires a deeper level of understanding before an effective therapy or cure can be found.

The Power point from the webinar presented to the LSINJ on 3.10.2019 and video from the seminar presented at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada on 2.4.2019 are identical.

GeorgePerryWebinLSINJ.3.10.2019.pptx
GeorgePerry.UManitoba.eos_2019_02_04.mp4

(2) Dr. Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D.; Webinar April 28th 2019

Founding President, CEO & CSO, Life Sciences Institute of New Jersey, Belle Mead, New Jersey, USA

Title: Switching from management of genetic lesions and their pathology(s) to preempting them – a sketch!

Abstract

Various studies have placed the numbers of disease pathology(s) with either genetic or genetic and environmental etiology as greater than 65% of all evaluated diseases and annual costs of hundreds of trillions of dollars. It is impossible to quantify the neurobiological and social impact of the most intractable and dehumanizing of diseases on individuals, families and communities. For convenience genetic diseases can be clearly delineated into events preceding and following the insertion of their causative genetic lesions into the genome as shown below:

(1) networks of genes maintaining & repairing genomes fail -> (2) insertion of genetic lesion -> (3) disease pathology manifested (only after additional factors are contributed)

We illustrate these points with the recent successful Gene Therapy of Sickle Cell Anemia in humans while contrasting its advantages and disadvantage as well as those of similar therapies. The current paradigm in medicine is based on immediate short term therapeutic intervention e.g. Gene Therapy, which are exclusively restricted to step 3. This is often when, due to the intractable nature of the disease, it is too late. Most of the fundamental and defining work on genetic mechanisms from step 1 leading to step 2 is done in simple Model Organisms where the necessary scientific basis and technical methods are available. However, by themselves none of these results and methods can lead to preempting step 2 in humans.

Step 2 occurs when genes for maintenance or repair of specific target genes (or general groups of sequences, loci, chromosomes and genomes) with which they are co-evolved are uncoupled or fail to function. Mechanisms and components collectively inserting mutations in the genome constitute the Mutome. Elucidating the failure of co-evolved genes and so the molecules, mechanisms, and processes leading to step 2 requires a relevant system for generating them. This system emerges from a well-established principle governing evolutionary genetics of speciation. Namely that when genomes of 2 species A and B are combined by mating into an interspecific genome A + B in the lab or field the frequencies of a broad spectrum of genetic lesions underlying several traits are significantly elevated.

Species A x Species B -> A + B genome -> (high frequency/broad spectrum) genetic lesions

This result is illustrated by our work on the destabilization of the mouse Y chromosome, its sex determining region (Sxr) and gene/locus (Sry) by combining them with interspecific genomes (Nallaseth, 1992; Nallaseth and Guo, 2011; Nallaseth et al, 2012, 2016). The genetic lesions underlying an array of traits such as sterility, inviability, XY female sex reversal, coat color variation and anemia may reveal associated lesions identified by ‘panning’ with methods of low level resolution. This contrasts with conventional high resolution targeting and selection of mutant phenotypes which do not reveal the serendipitous processes underlying the insertion of genetic disease lesions.

The application of this principle first in the Discovery Phase and then in the Analytical Phase with the power of high resolution contemporary methods allows the identification of relevant genetic networks, molecules and mechanisms failing in step 1 and leading to step 2 which together constitute the Combinatorial Approach surveilling and controlling the Mutome. For conceptual, scientific and technical reasons the mouse is the Model Organism of choice for initiating these studies. The emergent results can then be transposed to and applied in humans. The Combinatorial Approach depends on the application of a wide spectrum of principles and methods. In the Discovery Phase these include the application of lower to midlevel resolution with principles and methods of evolutionary genetics of speciation, SNPs, Haplotype Maps and Comparative sequencing. Arrays of defined mouse genomes and classical genetics can identify linkages structural and functional relationships of dysfunctional genes and loci with increasingly greater resolution using feral species, Inbred Strains, Consomic Strains, Recombinant Inbred Strains, Collaborative Cross Strains, etc... Informed by the specific nature of lesions identified in the Discovery Phase higher resolution methods of analyses can be incorporated into the Analytical Phase. They include, physico-chemical-biology, nanoscale to attoscale processes and sensors, OMICs, Mass Spectra, optonics, photonics, spectronics, laser/atomic tweezers, graphene biosensor applications, 3D cultures of spheroids/organoids, radiowaves, wireless, fibre optics, Artificial Intelligence and supercomputers. A broad schematic diagram or a Flow chart of this overview of the Combinatorial Approach could be:

(1)PREPARATIVE ORGANIZATIONAL PHASE <-> -> (2) INITIATION OF PARALLEL AND MULTIDIRECTIONAL DISCOVERY PHASE (MICE) <-> -> (3) SUPER-COMPUTATION <-> -> (4) OVERLAPPING, PROGRESSION INTO, PARALLEL AND MULTIDIRECTIONAL ANALYTICAL PHASE <-> -> (5) SUPER-COMPUTATION <-> -> (6) OPERATIONAL PHASE IN MICE (7) TRANSLATION OF RESULTS AND SYSTEMS TO HUMANS <-> -> (8) SUPER-COMPUTATION <-> -> (9) OPERATIONAL PHASE IN HUMANS <-> -> (10) PREEMPTION OF GENETIC DISEASE LESIONS.

These steps will lead to the systematization, surveillance and control of the networks of genes maintaining and repairing the human genome in real time which is required for preempting genetic disease lesions in humans. It will bring the indispensable shift in the current paradigm in medicine from post mutational management of pathology to preemption of diseases. Although the scientific, technical, conceptual, ethical and economic challenges facing the Combinatorial Approach are daunting they are not insurmountable. It is the Culture of Science that remains the single most significant barrier to even initiating this endeavor with all the enormity of its impact for the Public Interest. The underlying and implicit principles of unknown variables, scale, scope, dynamics, and nature, non-targeting and imprecision of the Combinatorial Approach are reflected in other similarly large undertakings that are resolved by Artificial Intelligence and supercomputers and that are currently underway. These include (1) next generation sequencing (NGS) and mapping of Connectomes of the Brain in the Life Sciences, (2) the discovery of Sub-atomic Particles in Particle Accelerators (e.g. Fermi Accelerators and the Large Hadron Collider) in the Physical Sciences, and (3) the exploration of Space.


FerezNallaseth2ndWebinar.4.28.2019.pptx

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(3) Prof. Syed M. Ahmed PhD; Webinar May 25th, 2019

Engineer, Chair Emeritus and Professor, College of Engineering and Technology, East Carolina State University, Greenville, NC, US.

Title: Construction Management and Engineering - its History, Challenges and Prospects in A Green World.

Abstract

Construction industry is a dynamic environment which is continuously evolving with continuous research and development. Construction has been around since the beginning of human existence in various forms. This presentation is a critical review of the past and present trends of the construction industry. There are many buildings which used to be there but now do not exist anymore either due to unskillful and faulty craftmanship or due to non-permanent materials. This indicates a non-green environment which does not promote recyclable materials. With time, the builders focused on the physics of the building which led to further development. The development of different materials like concrete and steel revolutionized the construction industry. Advanced materials are still being tested for further development and use. The present details about the construction spending in the United States is also discussed. In addition to this, the presentation also comprises of an overview of the construction industry on a global level. A comparison of the global market construction growth is shown between the major countries of the world. The challenges that the construction industry is facing today is also discussed. The adversarial relationship between the General contractor and sub-contractor which is becoming an obstacle in the market growth of the construction industry is shown. Statistics regarding the challenges such as retirement of aging boomers, unfavorable contract terms, safety, project delays, labor shortages and tariffs are reviewed. The future technologies which are assisting in improving the construction industry are discussed. Future technologies discussed include 3-D Printing, Smart Roads, Self-Healing Concrete, porous pavement, smart bricks and the shifting of the industry towards a green technology market .

Ahmed,S.3rdWebinarCMGT.6.1.2019.pdf

(4) Prof. Kholis A. Audah, Ph.D.; Webinar July 6th 2019

Vice Director for Research, Swiss German University, Edu Town BSD City, Tangerang 15339, Banten, Indonesia

Title: Drug Discovery: A Biodiversity Perspective

Abstract

Conventional drug discovery is believed to be much slower than the emerging of diseases. It could also cost pharmaceutical companies hundreds of millions of dollars with no guarantee that the process would be a successful one. Therefore, new alternatives for drug discovery methods are urgently required.

Nature has been known as long as human history as very rich sources for various types of human needs including as medicinal sources. By implementing the concept of antigen versus antibody, venom versus antidote somehow taught us that Mother Nature has provided us the cures for every disease. It is just a matter of how to find the right drug for particular disease which is already available in the nature. In the United States of America alone, approximately 50% of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration from the year 1981 until the year 2010 were originated from natural product pure extracts or their derivatives.

This chapter briefly described the power of nature as the abundant sources to find drugs for different kinds of illnesses include the challenges associated with the drug discovery process. By virtue of biodiversity both on land and in oceans, researchers can collect as many as possible extracts (extract library) that can be utilized as medicines through screening process. Drug discovery through screening process utilizing natural products can become a solution of the slow and expensive drug discovery process using conventional way. By the advancement of screening technology such as high throughput screening, thousands of extracts and or bioactive compounds can be screened against different types of diseases only in one day. The availability of extract library allows the acceleration of drug discovery in a faster and cheaper way.

Indonesia as one of the richest country in the world in biodiversity has high potential in providing a large collection of extracts for drug discovery purposes. One of potential plants as medicinal sources is Mangrove. Mangroves and mangrove associates widely spread along roughly 90000 kilometer Indonesian coastline. Indonesia is home of about 20 family with about hundreds species of mangroves and their associates. Indonesia has the largest mangrove forest or about 23% of total world mangrove forests. Taken altogether, Indonesia offers invaluable medicinal sources. This opens up many opportunities for collaboration among researchers nationally and internationally.

Keywords: natural products, biodiversity, extract library, drug discovery, screening


Kholis A. Audah.4thWebinar.7.6.2019.pdf

(5) Dr. Adam Bogart, Ph.D.; Webinar

Board Member Life Sciences Institute of New Jersey, Belle Mead, New Jersey, USA.

TITLE: Neuroradiology 1896-2005

ABSTRACT:

A sampling of historical neurological and psychiatric cases and their radiological findings to illustrate the development of neuroimaging during the period 1896-2000. They are short cases studies demonstrating each imaging modality, how it worked, and its purpose. Many are now archaic, but all make for a fascinating lesson in the development of diagnosis of pathology in the brain and spinal cord.

Dr. Adam Bogart’s interests are in both functional and structural neuroimaging (MRI) of the neuropsychiatric disorders. In 2010 Dr. Bogart was awarded a Doctorate (Ph.D.) in Behavioral Neuroscience (Experimental Psychology) at Kent State University at Kent, OH. Dr. Bogart then went onto hold a number of Research and Postdoctoral Fellowship positions in Neuropsychiatric diseases, Neuroimaging and MRI modeling of Neuropsychiatric diseases; Neurodegeneration and Aging at Frontline Universities and Research Institutions. In addition, he is Chief of Imaging Operations (CIO); Chief of Statistical and Mathematical Operations (CISMO) in the LSINJ. Additional positions and responsibilities in the LSINJ are listed on its website.

AdamBogart.5thWebinar.8.3.2019.ppt

(6) BioViva CEO Elizabeth Parrish; Webinar August 31st 2019

Title: Creating Human Health span And Longevity Through Gene Therapy

Abstract

Biotechnology is at a critical point, comparable to the exponential growth of IT technology in past decades. If we grasp the opportunity, biotech offers a new, attractive engine of growth and vital solutions to today’s biggest challenges. Despite early setbacks, gene therapy and gene editing are finally achieving wider public interest and investment - offering a permanent cure for diseases once believed incurable. With AAV, Lentivirus and now gene editing in over 140 clinical trials the world is on the cusp of a revolution. Alongside traditional gene therapy comes gene editing CRISPR-Cas9 was named the technological breakthrough of the year in 2015, gene editing technologies are now being used in a growing number of clinical trials worldwide; the first human CRISPR trials are now being conducted in all over the world.

As our technology matures, our approach to medicine must also mature; moving beyond treating individual diseases to a preventative, precise treatment model designed for each individual. Evolving diagnostic and prognostic technology is now expediting the clinical trial process by enabling affordable N=1 trials that provide us with essential safety and efficacy data, fast - helping treatment arrive at the clinic quicker than ever before. Treating age-related diseases such as cancer or cardiovascular disease alone is also an ineffective and inefficient use of resources. We must begin targeting the aging process itself, and BioViva is attempting to do exactly that by pioneering bold, cutting-edge medical solutions. Gene therapy must evolve to become genomic therapy; creating a world in which we achieve precise control of our genome and optimise human health while ensuring healthy, productive longevity for all society.

Biosketch

Elizabeth Parrish is the Founder and CEO of BioViva USA Inc., the first company to apply a safe dual gene therapy to a primary mechanism of aging (telomere shortening) in a human patient. Along with her team of medical doctors and PhD scientists, her goal is to make healthy longevity available to all. Elizabeth is campaigning for essential regulatory change and disruptive new business models to expedite the translation of research breakthroughs into the clinic for those in need today. She has held business administration roles at biotech and software companies, and is the owner of Biotrove Investments. She serves on the board of the Regenerative Technology Alliance and a founder of the International Longevity Alliance. Her activities are reflected in major media publications around the world, including making the list of the top 100 most influential people in the world of drug development and manufacture.

THE WEBINAR BELOW IS LIVE BUT REQUIRES THE iTUNES APP:

Video - BioViva, LizParrish.8.31.2019..mp4

(7) Prof. Hafiz Yahya, PhD; October 12th, 2019

Avian Diversity In India

Hafiz Yahya, PhD, Life Sciences Institute of New Jersey, Belle Mead, NJ 08502; Dean, Faculty of Life Sciences; Professor, Dept. of Wildlife Sciences, A. M.U Aligarh – India; Member, Higher Education Group, 12th Five Year Plan, Government of India

Abstract

Spirit of avian conservation and appreciation is deeply rooted in Indian culture and ethos. Many ancient folklores, paintings and sculptures provide illustrative accounts of how earlier people enjoyed watching, eating, taming, dreaming and even worshiping birds. Considering the importance of biodiversitythe doctrine and philosophy of all regions strongly support it. I have discussed this in detail in my book BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION ETHICS IN MAJOR RELIGIONS.

Biodiversity conservation and climate change are among the most important contemporary issues facing humankind. There is a pressing need to tackle these issues with utmost sincerity by biologists, nature conservatisms, developmental agencies, religions clergies as well as politicians; otherwise thehumankind would jeopardize its own existence on this planet.

Owing to diverse bio-geographical and climatological regimes, India is bestowed with a very rich biodiversity and is rightly considered as one of the twelve Mega-biodiversity zones of the world;comprising of 446 Important Bird Areas that supports occurrence of about 1300 species (out of 10065 species world over). Although Carl Linnaeus (1664)had also mentioned some Indian birds in his system of Binomial nomenclature, the scientific documentation of Indian birds started with the invent of British in India. Thus India has a history of over three centuries old ornithology. Several British Army, Medical and Civil Officers were keen naturalists and maintained well documentations of our flora and fauna. A. O. Hume (1888), the founder of Indian National Congress is also considered father of Indian Ornithology. The eleven volumes of journal Stray Feathers edited by him is a landmark in documentation of Indian birds. The revised edition of Birds of Indian Empires in four volumes and three volumes of Modification of Birds of Indian Empires by StuartsBaker(1922 - 1930) are other very valuable publications. Based on Baker’s, Salim Ali and S. Dripple (1964-1972) published ten volumes of Handbook of Birds of India and Pakistan thatcan be considered to be the Bible of Indian Ornithology. Salim Ali’s life and work has had a remarkable influence on the conservation and propagation of avian study and due to his lifetime patronage birds became a ‘Flagship’ of nature conservation movements in India. Publication of his book, The Book of Indian Birds by Salim Ali (my Ph.D. supervisor), first published in 1941 and 14th enlarged and revised edition in 2006, remains a milestone for amateur bird watchers and students of ornithology. This book made a great impact even on some politicians. PunditJawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of India, sent a copy of this book to his daughter Indira Gandhi on her 7th birth day while he was imprisoned in Allahabad Jail. Consequently all three Prime Ministers of India from the Nehru family had a great love for nature conservation.

Despite a glorious past, due to gradual decline in the quality and content of most of the wildlife habitats, the future of India’s wildlife, vis-à-vis birds, is far from secure. Environmental degradation, more notably the decline and fragmentation of forest cover in India is perhaps the most damaging factor for jeopardizing the sustainability of our faunal and floral heritage. Indiscriminate use of pesticides and insecticides and ineffective implementation of wildlife protection laws, and other anthropogenic pressures are adversely affecting the avifauna of the country. On a rough estimate, over hundred species of Indian birds are struggling under various categories of endangerment, while the future of the rest is also insecure. While population of vultures has crashed alarmingly, and that too within a very short period of time,the population of common birds like house sparrows, parakeets, baya weaver birds, etc., are also declining. Though the reduction in birds’ population is perhaps a global phenomenon, we need to discuss this issue more seriously as India’s economy is largely based on agriculture and horticulture and birds play vital role in cleansing the insects and rodent pests from the field and orchards. The birds do damage the products to some extent at times, but in the words of Late Dr. Salim Ali this issue could be considered as ‘laborer’s hire’. Besides various economic benefits and food value, the ecological services birds render is of immense value.

In the post globalization development plan of India large tracts of natural habitats are being converted to agricultural and urban landscapes. The demographic and socio-economic factors in these areas have an adverse impact on the spatio-temporal dynamics of bird community and habitat. Hence biodiversity conservation in urban landscapes is also important.Because in the event of vanishing forests home gardens and parks can sustain and develop ecological complexity to the extent that they can provide necessary biodiversity and ecosystem services across the tropics. Further, the importance of urban parks within the cities is highlighted as hotspots for biodiversity. Park size accounts for the high indicators of species diversity but fragmentation is detrimental for the populations of resident bird species especially during breeding season. As increasing the park size within cities is not achievable, habitat diversity can be increased along with resource availability by adding nest boxes, bird feeders and bird baths to the parks. Official policy making, research and awareness are other key factors.

In addition to various conservation measures prevailing in the country, we ought to emphasize the importance of education and awareness more elaborately and effectively. There is an urgent need to identify areas of gaps even in the regime of research and management of Indian birds. This is also true for the conservation of other wildlife species. Several recent exercises, including preparation of National Biodiversity Action Plan (NBAP), cleaning of Ganges, Project tiger, etc., have so far not yielded the desired results. An analytical scientific approach is needed to formulate policies to balance the country’s development initiatives and nature conservation programs. The mad rush of unsustainable development may endanger both: biodiversity on which the mankind depends so heavily, as well as the future of a healthy environment which is imperative for the survival of nature as well as the Homo sapiens.

Video-7thWeb.LSINJ.ProfHafizYahya.10.12.2019..mp4

(8) Dr. Alex Diaz, Ph.D.; Webinar November 11th, 2019

Sports Mental Edge, New York, NY & Life Sciences Institute of New Jersey, Belle Mead, NJ 08502

Title: Merging Interoceptive Knowledge with Peak Performance in Sports

Abstract

The workshop aims at educating participants about interoceptive knowledge, its clinical implications, and its relevance in sport performance.

Interoceptive awareness brings attention to the felt sense of our bodies as a conduit to elicit implicit memory. These memories lead to both, pleasant and uncomfortable body sensations, which are the body’s non-verbal manifestation of thwarted fight, flight, or freeze responses. When individuals are exposed to high levels of stressful experiences, our organic nervous system engages into an autonomic physiological responses for the purpose of remaining safe (Siegel, 1999). Under the impossibility to engage survival fight/flight responses, these bodily stored incomplete responses are again relived when the individual’s sensory awareness perceives a new threat that resembles that of the original stressful episodes (Pollatos, Kirsch, & Schandry, 2005). Under the impossibility to organically complete thwarted responses, a compromised nervous system develops, leading to patterns of unhealthy behaviors (Cozolino, 2006). Anger, high levels of anxiety, smoking, drinking, and disordered eating become the body’s way to navigate a compromised organic state (Levine, 1997).

The workshop will explain the neuroscience behind human physiology and how its compromised instinctual responses may create havoc and repeated unhealthy patterns (Pennebaker, 1983). The workshop will combine lecture on neuroscience and interoceptive psychology, and provide experiential exercises to enhance personal self-awareness to regulate emotions and promote peak performance readiness.

Participants will learn:

1- Understanding how bi-directional communication between our nervous system and the brain supports the development of emotional regulation to enhance focus;

2- Explain Polyvagal Theory: It will explain how our bodies’ neurological mechanisms regulate social engagement, and fight, flight and freeze responses. This theory explains an athlete’s normal physiological stressful responses that can become habitual patterns, such as choking under pressure, impulsive behaviors, compromised digestive system (throwing up), headaches, and many other bodily symptoms;

3- It is not what we “see”, but what we “perceive.” The brain’s way to assess the environment may go against what the athlete “believes” it really is;

4- Use felt-sense awareness exercises to better assist athletes regulate their own emotions, so the become more empowered by knowing and using their own implicit body knowledge rather than developing dependency on external emotional regulators, which are oftentimes unhealthy options;

5- Understanding the “Window of Tolerance,” a range of physiological equilibrium that promotes focus and grounding to achieve “in the zone” performance;

The workshop will provide research-based knowledge about how we can embrace our body sensations for the purpose of self-regulation and enhanced focus (Rothschild, 2000), which are key traits in achieving peak performance. Invididuals are used to attending to their bodies when they feel pain or discomfort, but bodies also manifest positive felt-sense experiences (Mehling et al., 2009). In fact, these positive felt-sense experiences are the neurological foundation for self-regulation (Levine, 1997). By providing an educational explanation of brain functioning, theories, and experiential exercises, participants will greatly understand at a much deeper level the wisdom of our bodies and how we can capitalize to manage and expand self-regulation (Siegel, 1999).

An athlete’s dysregulated nervous system has been accounted for unhealthy choices (Cogan, 2005). As the nervous system is attempting to self-regulate, its compromised hyperarousal or dissociation stuck state seeks outside “helpers” to bring emotional homoeostasis (Rothschild, 2000). Unfortunately, these unhealthy choices can become detrimental habits and, consequently, potential concerns for the athletes’ overall health.

More than ever before, athletes are under highly stressful competitive demands as competition is reaching unseen levels (Weinberg & Gould, 2011). Although improvements in physical training, skills, and nutrition have greatly contributed to enhancing achievement, the mental component greatly determines how to sustain focus when it matters most (Weinberg & Gould, 2011). To that end, a physiologically organic coping skill, such as interoceptive awareness, provides a source of self-knowledge that teaches athletes to attend to their implicit language that serves to not only as a tool to manage emotions in competition, but also as a life skill resource.

References

Cogan, K. D. (2005). Eating Disorders: When rations become irrational. In S. Murphy (Ed.). The sport psych handbook (pp.237-253). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics

Cozolino, L. (2006). The neuroscience of human relationships. New York, NY: Norton.

Levine, P.A. (1997). Waking the tiger. Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Books.

MacLean, P.D. (1993). On the evolution of three mentalities. In J.B. Ashbrook (Ed.). Brain, culture & the human spirit: Essays from an emergent evolutionary perspective (pp. 15–44). Lanham, MD: University Press of America.

Mehling, W.E., Gopiseetty, V., Daubenmier, J., Price, C., Hecht, F.M., & Stewart, A. (2009). Body awareness: Construct and self-report measures. PloS ONE, 4(5), 1–18.

Pennebaker, J.W. (1983). Implicit psychophysiology: Effects of common beliefs and idiosyncratic physiological responses on symptom reporting. Journal of Personality, 51(3), 468–496.

Pollatos, O., Kirsch, W., & Schandry, R. (2005). On the relationship between interoceptive awareness, emotional experience, and brain process. Cognitive Brain Research, 25, 948–962.

Porges, S. (2008). The polyvagal theory: New insights into adaptive reactions of the autonomic nervous system. Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, 75 (Supplement X), 81–85. Retrieved from http://www.lifespanlearn.org/documents/Porges%20Polyvagal%20Theory.pdf Price, C.J., & Thompson, E.A. (2007). Measuring dimensions of body connections: Body awareness and bodily dissociation. Journal of Alternative Complementary Medicine, 13(9), 945–953.

Rothschild, B. (2000). The body remembers: The psychology of trauma and trauma treatment. London, UK: Norton.

Siegel, D.J. (1999). The developing brain: How relationships and the brain interact to shape who we are. New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Weinberg, R., & Gould, D. (2011). Foundation of Sport and Exercise Psychology. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics


Video -8thWeb.LSINJ.Dr.AlexDiaz.2019..mp4

(9) Dr. Nirmali Wijegoonawardana, Ph.D.; Webinar January 1st, 2020

LSINJ BM: CHABMR (Chief Historian & Archivist for Biomedical Research) Primary External External Affiliation: Historian, Senior Lecturer and Head, Department of History, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka (Ceylon) (2015 – present)

Title: Medicinal plants in Sri Lanka: A review !

Abstract

A principle question of the modern world today has been the true efficacy of medicinal plants and herbal products. Millions of people around the world are affected by neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia, Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. It is estimated that 15% of the population in western countries are affected by one of these diseases. Despite many advances in the field of medicine no remedy is available yet to combat the situation. Treatment with enzyme inhibitors such as acetylcholine esterase only gives temporary relief. Many herbs are known to contain these inhibitors naturally along with hundreds of other beneficial constituents. They can either prevent the onset of these degenerative diseases or slow down progress of the condition. Consequently resulting in an exponential increase in the employ of medicinal plants in technologically advanced societies has ensued in multiple drugs and key chemotherapy products being acquired and contrived through the use of medicinal plants. Sri Lanka is known for its plethora of biodiversity with numerous plant resources. Vast majorities of the plants found in Sri Lanka have medicinal properties in them and thus have the potential to be used as medicines to treat many heath diseases. Medicinal plants have already been employed as mechanisms of treatment in Sri Lanka. Some of the traditional methods of Sri Lankan medicinal practices comprise of Ayurveda, Unani and Deshiya Chikitsa, where plants are used as tools for remedies of diseases. Some of the medicinal plants in Sri Lanka offer a more practical usage such as plants with rich sources of antioxidants, which help prevent and delay various diseased conditions. A prime example of this is the Curcuma longa, popularly known as turmeric or Indian saffron. Originating from South Asia and cultivated in India, Sri Lanka, China, and Java. Reputed for a wide range of medicinal uses in Ayurveda. The Rhizome of this plant is used for medicinal purpose. Asians use the powder of the rhizome of this herb in preparation of curries. Low occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases among Asians (2%) has been attributed to regular consumption of turmeric by way of curries. Curcumin is regarded as the main active constituent. Sri Lankan medicinal techniques employ the use of the entire plant including the leaves, roots, fruits, flowers and bark to treat symptoms of disease. For instance, the Popular Clove oil is extracted from the floral buds of Syzygium Aromaticum which are subsequently used for the cure of toothache as Clove oil has both antibiotic and antiseptic properties. Therefore, this study will provide overview of herbal plants used in the traditional medicinal practices of Sri Lanka.

Video-9thWeb.LSINJ.PrNirmaliW.1.4.2020..mp4

(10) VP Ralph Sherman, B.S.; Webinar February 8th, 2020

LSINJ BM: Vice President & Chief of Biophysics Operations; Chief of Technology Transfer Operations; Chief of Electronics Operations; Chief of Biophysics Technology Transfer - Central Nervous System (EEG) Thermodynamics; Group Leader in Groups on Biophysics, Electronics and Technology Transfer Operations; Member Group on Neurosciences, Neuropathology, Neuropsychiatric Diseases, Experimental Psychology, Anoxia Tolerance, Thermodynamic States of Hypoxic Neurophysiological Systems

Primary External External Affiliation: Biophysics Technology Transfer - Central Nervous System (EEG) Thermodynamics, Myrtle Point, Oregon, USA (2004 - Present)

Title: Transition State Theory (TST): Sodium (Na+) transport in Alzheimer's Disease.

Abstract

Transition State Theory

I have 40 posts on Slide Share. I use them like an old time “Scrap Rook of Memories.” Some of them are related to my study of Transition State Theory. Here is image number 12 from my reinterpretation of data regarding neuronal sodium transport in Alzheimer’s disease.

https://www.slideshare.net/ralphsherman33/least-action-parametric-quantification-of-ad-na-k-atpase-in-ee-compensation

From my LinkedIn Profile:

Seeking collaboration studying the quotients: G/k and G/S as derived from Transition State Theory. G/k has the dimension Action per mol per mol. G/S has the dimension Temperature (Kelvin). I call the quotients Gibbs Molar Action and Temperature Quotient. I assume that they are key measurable parameters of the TST Activated Complex.

http://www.slideshare.net/ralphsherman33/transition-state-theory-eeg-alpha-rhythm

http://www.slideshare.net/ralphsherman33/gibbs-molar-action-29061607

http://www.slideshare.net/ralphsherman33/temperature-quotient-tst

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I started this project in 1952 when I first learned of the 1936 Arrhenius Plot EEG work of Hudson Hoagland.

I met Hoagland at the Biophysics Meeting in Pittsburg in 1958. I visited Koella at Ciba in ca. 1980.

https://www.slideshare.net/ralphsherman33/werner-koella-1954/1

Video-10thWeb.LSINJ.VPShermanR.2.8.2020.mp4

(11) VP Jean Plante, Webinar March 8th, 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Vice President for Bioethics, Philosophy, Neurosciences at the interphase with Biology; Derivation of Medical Equipment similar to (NGPDT).

Member of Working Group in LSINJ and Group Leader: First Working Group: Evolutionary Genetics, Reproductive Biology and Preemptive Medicine consisting of Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D., George Perry, Ph.D., Tony Lai, MD, M.B.B.S., FACOG and Liz Parrish, CEO/CMaO) (Co-Group Leaders: Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D. and Tony Lai, M.D., M.B.B.S. and FACOG; Second working group: Co - Leader of Group for Pharmaceutical Liaison – Developing Societies; Third working group: Member of Group for Public Science Education in Developing Societies consisting of George Perry, Ph.D., Dr. Alex Diaz, Kholis Audah, Ph.D., Tony Lai, M.D., Hafiz S. Yahya, Ph.D., Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D., Syed M. Ahmed, Ph.D. Liz Parrish, CEO/CMO and Nirmali Wijegoonawardana, Ph.D. (Co-Group Leader with others; International representation: U.S.A., India, Pakistan, Jamaica, India and Sri Lanka).

External affiliations: Consultant/coordinator for NGPDT

Title: ‘REALITY and, our reality’

Abstract

An interactive conference/webinar.

Multiple topics considering partially explaining today's so-called modern world.

Articles under where you can read some notion of so-called empirical science!

Topics cover medicine, mental health and today (‘s) generalize health problems directly linked to our lifestyle. I will go back as far as the beginning of agriculture creating poverty (.) Almost around the globe!

REALITY versus our reality!

Before you judge others or claim any absolute truth, consider that…

… you can see less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum and hear less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum. As you read this, you are travelling at 220 kilometres per second across the galaxy (.) 90% of the cell in your body carry their own microbial DNA and are not « YOU ».

The atoms in your body are 99.9999999999999999% empty space and none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in the belly of a star.

Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less than the common potato. The existence of a rainbow depends on the conical photoreceptors in your eyes; (for) the animals without cones, rainbows do not exist. So you don’t just look at the rainbow, you create it. This is pretty amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colours (that) you see represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum!

"Writing with characteristic verve, Diamond’s “Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race” summarizes an impressive amount of material in just three pages. At the top of the second and third pages, he headlines the main point: “The adoption of agriculture, supposedly the decisive step to a better life, was in fact catastrophic. With agriculture came the curses of social and sexual inequality, disease, and despotism” (1987, 65-66)."

https://www.livinganthropologically.com/archaeology/agriculture-worst-mistake/

https://current-oncology.com/index.php/oncology/article/view/5165/4289

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/315e/5d7d15c8470bc00e0fbd00ecb8ebe2158e25.pdf

Video-11thWeb.LSINJ.VPPlanteJ.3.8.2020.mp4

(12) BM Neuroscientist Sina Varmaghani, M.S., Webinar May 2nd, 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Board Member and Group Member of Engineering, Cognition, Neuroscientific, Computational and Gaming Groups, Interests: Perception, Visual-Spatial cognition, Cognitive linguistics, Depression.

Member of Working Group in LSINJ : Sina Varmaghani, M.Sc., Director and Liaison with Scientific Institutions in Iran; Neurosciences, Neuropsychiatry, Neurophysiology and Psychology, Thermodynamics of Neural Functions under Hypoxic Conditions, Stroke and Ischemia in Anoxia Tolerant Turtle brains, Mutational Basis of Brain Cancers and Neurodegenerative Diseases - George Perry, Ph.D., Adam Bogart, Ph.D., Ralph Sherman, B.S., Alex Diaz, Ph.D., Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D. & Sina Varmaghani, MSc (Group Leader – George Perry, Ph.D.); Engineering and Construction Ralph Sherman, B.S. and Syed M. Ahmed, Ph.D. (Group Leader); Neuropsychiatric diseases, neuroimaging and MRI modeling of neuropsychiatric diseases; Neurodegeneration and Aging. Radiology and statistical analysis of brain metabolites during normal aging and pathological animal models of Neurodegenerative Disease under conditions of caloric restriction, George Perry, Ph.D., Adam Bogart, Ph.D., Ralph Sherman, B.S., Alex Diaz, Ph.D., & Ferez Nallaseth, Ph.D. & Sina Varmaghani, M.Sc. (Group Leader – Adam Bogart); Adam Bogart, Ralph Sherman B.S. and Sina Varmaghani, M.Sc. Group on Statistical and Mathematical Operations (Group Leader - Adam Bogart, Ph.D. (CISMO – Chief of Statistical & Mathematical Operations); Groups on Biophysics, Electronics and Technology Transfer Operations, Ralph Sherman, B.S., Adam Bogart, Ph.D., Syed M. Ahmed, Ph.D., George Perry, Ph.D., & Sina Varmaghani, M.Sc., (Co-Group Leaders, Ralph Sherman, B.S., Adam Bogart, Ph.D. & George Perry, Ph.D.).

External affiliations: Department of Psychology, University of Isfahan, Iran; Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Urmia University, Iran.

Title: A pathological review on spatial memory

Abstract

Knowing where one is, where resources are, and how to get to safety are some of the most fundamental and important challenges faced by all animals. When specified formally, these challenges seem to be exceedingly complex; yet they are routinely performed by even the simplest organisms and the most absent-minded people. Moreover, these basic abilities are typically prerequisites for other more complex behaviors. Spatial cognition is a branch of cognitive science that seeks to understand how humans and other animals perceive, interpret, mentally represent, and interact with the spatial characteristics of their environment. Nearly all behavior has spatial consequences, and many of the psychological processes that underlie behavior have spatial content. A basis for organizing the field of spatial cognition recognizes a primary distinction between cognition that is needed for interaction with one’s immediate environment and cognition that is based on stored knowledge about space. This approach essentially organizes space temporally into (a) online structures and processes that handle dynamic transient spatial information and (b) offline structures and processes that encode, store, and retrieve spatial information over the long term. The distinction between online and offline treatment of spatial information parallels the distinction between perception and memory in the general cognitive literature. Online spatial processes enable an organism to situate itself in the present moment and to interpret and use spatial relationships such as distances and directions to achieve immediate goals. Offline spatial processes involve the long-term encoding, storage, and retrieval of spatial information and enable complex behaviors such as navigation, route planning, and direction giving. In this presentation the characteristics of Offline spatial processes and in particular spatial memory, its associated brain regions, disorders, and drugs affecting spatial memory will be discussed.

Video-12thWeb.LSINJ.BM.VarmaghaniS.5.2.2020.mp4

(13) Vice President/BM Dickson Achimugu Musa, Ph.D. Webinar June 6th 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Vice President (Scientific Research Decisions - Africa); CPL (Chief of Pharmaceutical Liaison – Developing Societies of Africa);

Member of Working Group in LSINJ: (section in this website on Board Members)

External affiliations: Deputy Dean, Faculty of Natural Sciences, IBB University, Lapai, Nigeria

Title: DRUG DISCOVERY FROM NIGERIAN BIODIVERSITY: CHALLENGES AND PROSPECT

Abstract

Nigeria is the most populous black nation, with a rich cultural and biological diversity. The Nigerian biodiversity spans from the mangrove swamp of the South to the arid drylands of the North, through thick rainforest vegetation and savannah grassland. Nigeria’s biodiversity has largely provided for the nutritional, economic and medical needs of the people from time immemorial. The medical needs are supplied by the natural products of the biodiversity. Natural products are small pharmacologically or biologically active chemical substances that are produced by a biological source. Natural products can be an entire organism (e.g. a plant, an animal or a micro-organism), a part of an organism (e.g. leaves or flowers of a plant, an isolated animal organ), an extract of an organism or part of an organism and an exudate, or pure compound (e.g. alkaloids, coumarins, flavonoids, lignans, steroids and terpenoids) isolated from plants, animals or micro-organisms. However, for the purpose of drug discovery, the term natural product generally refers to secondary metabolites which in the correct chiral configuration exert biological activity, but have no “primary” function, directly involved in the normal growth, development or reproduction of an organism. The use of natural products as medicines has been described throughout history in the form of traditional medicines, remedies, potions and oils with many of these bioactive natural products still yet to be identified and documented. Drug discovery is the process by which new candidate medications are discovered. Historically, drugs were discovered through identifying the active ingredient from traditional remedies or by serendipitous discovery. Later chemical libraries of synthetic small molecules, natural products or extracts were screened in intact cells or whole organisms to identify substances that have a desirable therapeutic effect in a process known as classical pharmacology. In this webinar, we shall be considering the current state of drug discovery from Nigerian biodiversity, the challenges and the prospects.


Video-13thWeb.LSINJ.VP.Musa,D.6.6.2020.mp4

(14 repeat 11) VP Jean Plante, Webinar July 4th, 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Vice President for Bioethics, Philosophy, Neurosciences at the interphase with Biology; Derivation of Medical Equipment similar to (NGPDT).

Member of Working Group in LSINJ and Group Leader: First Working Group: Evolutionary Genetics, Reproductive Biology and Preemptive Medicine consisting of Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D., George Perry, Ph.D., Tony Lai, MD, M.B.B.S., FACOG and Liz Parrish, CEO/CMaO) (Co-Group Leaders: Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D. and Tony Lai, M.D., M.B.B.S. and FACOG; Second working group: Co - Leader of Group for Pharmaceutical Liaison – Developing Societies; Third working group: Member of Group for Public Science Education in Developing Societies consisting of George Perry, Ph.D., Dr. Alex Diaz, Kholis Audah, Ph.D., Tony Lai, M.D., Hafiz S. Yahya, Ph.D., Ferez S. Nallaseth, Ph.D., Syed M. Ahmed, Ph.D. Liz Parrish, CEO/CMO and Nirmali Wijegoonawardana, Ph.D. (Co-Group Leader with others; International representation: U.S.A., India, Pakistan, Jamaica, India and Sri Lanka).

External affiliations: Consultant/coordinator for NGPDT

Title: ‘REALITY and, our reality’

Abstract

An interactive conference/webinar.

Multiple topics considering partially explaining today's so-called modern world.

Articles under where you can read some notion of so-called empirical science!

Topics cover medicine, mental health and today (‘s) generalize health problems directly linked to our lifestyle. I will go back as far as the beginning of agriculture creating poverty (.) Almost around the globe!

REALITY versus our reality!

Before you judge others or claim any absolute truth, consider that…

… you can see less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum and hear less than 1% of the acoustic spectrum. As you read this, you are travelling at 220 kilometres per second across the galaxy (.) 90% of the cell in your body carry their own microbial DNA and are not « YOU ».

The atoms in your body are 99.9999999999999999% empty space and none of them are the ones you were born with, but they all originated in the belly of a star.

Human beings have 46 chromosomes, 2 less than the common potato. The existence of a rainbow depends on the conical photoreceptors in your eyes; (for) the animals without cones, rainbows do not exist. So you don’t just look at the rainbow, you create it. This is pretty amazing, especially considering that all the beautiful colours (that) you see represent less than 1% of the electromagnetic spectrum!

"Writing with characteristic verve, Diamond’s “Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race” summarizes an impressive amount of material in just three pages. At the top of the second and third pages, he headlines the main point: “The adoption of agriculture, supposedly the decisive step to a better life, was in fact catastrophic. With agriculture came the curses of social and sexual inequality, disease, and despotism” (1987, 65-66)."

https://www.livinganthropologically.com/archaeology/agriculture-worst-mistake/

https://current-oncology.com/index.php/oncology/article/view/5165/4289

https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/315e/5d7d15c8470bc00e0fbd00ecb8ebe2158e25.pdf

Video-14th(11)Web.LSINJ.VPPlanteJ.3.8.2020.mp4

(15) Dr. Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, Webinar August 1st 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Founding President, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Scientific Officer (CSO), Chief Financial Office (CFO) & Principal Donor;

Member of Working Group in LSINJ: (section in this website on Board Members)

External affiliations: (section in this website on Board Members)

Title: Morphogenesis of skin in 3D co-cultures - sorting and mixing of interspecific, intra-specific, differentiated and stem cells traced with lineage specific keratins.


Abstract:

In mouse models Inter-follicular Epithelial (IFE) and Hair Follicle (HF) stem cells exclusively yield the epithelial layer under homeostasis and wound healing conditions. In vitro studies in 3D were initiated due to regulatory constraints and functional differences between murine and human skin. Combinations (12) of intraspecific, interspecific, primary, established, differentiated and stem cells were analyzed by 4 approaches. In hanging drop (HD) cultures, cells have the same opportunity to interact as they would in vivo. Published HD methods were extensively adapted to the analysis of skin morphogenesis which at least initially followed constraints imposed by the Differential Adhesion Hypothesis (DAH). HD aggregate formation displayed serum and cell type dependent spectrum of demixing behaviors. At equilibrium, human dermal cells and keratinocytes completely demixed from each other, thus exhibiting very low to non-existent levels of cross-adhesion possibly required for boundary formation. However, demixing of other interspecific and stem cell combinations was more variable even at equilibrium. This contrasts with embryogenesis when the differentiation of the single cellular embryonic epithelium is obligatorily dependent on contact with the underlying mesoderm in initiating the morphogenesis of skin. In Human Skin Equivalents (HSEs) morphology, with exceptions e.g. HF, but not morphogenesis, recapitulates in vivo skin. However, in 2D gel electrophoresis, proteins extracted from HSEs displayed differentiation stage specific mobility of keratins. In contrast in 2D co-cultures of HDFn and rat stem cells exhibited highly variable distributions, which were more consistent with isotypic affinities of cell types. These differences may identify a requirement for additional components for in vivo morphogenesis of these cell types into skin. Whether transient contact induces expression of HF, IFE and SC specific epitopes of keratin in all 3D cultures is being established.

Video-15thWeb.LSINJ.NallasethFS.8.1.2020.mp4

(16) Dr. Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, Webinar September 5th 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Founding President, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Scientific Officer (CSO), Chief Financial Office (CFO) & Principal Donor;

Member of Working Group in LSINJ: (section in this website on Board Members)

External affiliations: (section in this website on Board Members)

Title: Comparative evolutionary analysis of the neurophysiological and molecular basis of anoxia resistant turtle and hypoxia sensitive mammalian brains to identify oxygen responsive targets in neurodevelopment

Abstract

In mammalian brains, hypoxia is lethal within five minutes but turtle brains (Trachemys scripta) can recover from 24 hours of anoxia. Genes previously studied in hypoxic mammalian brains and regulating immediate-early responses, heat shock, apoptosis, mitochondrial biogenesis, respiration, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis were examined in normoxic, hypoxic and anoxic turtle brains. High-stringency annealment of turtle gDNA with mammalian (mouse, rat, human) probes followed by sequence alignments with the turtle genome validated their conservation. One clear candidate supporting hypoxia resistance was elevated levels of Hif1a and Hif1b identified by Northern blots. However, kinetics of the two partners of AP1 RNAs were distinct. Concomitantly HIF1 and AP1 from turtle brain extracts and MDA-231 breast cancer cell extracts bound to and shifted their consensus motifs in EMSAs. In addition to AP-1 binding, upregulation of several anti-apoptosis oncogenes was noted: c-Jun, Bcl2, c-Fos & Hsp70. Unexpectedly Nad5, encoding a protein in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, was not upregulated at any time point, unlike in cardiac hypoxia. These and other neurophysiological results suggest that, under conditions of limiting energy (ATP) and reducing (NADH) equivalents the evolutionary loss of the ability of mammalian brain to resist hypoxia correlates with its metabolic and ion channel extravagance, in contrast to the conservatism of turtle brain including inhibiting depolarizing channels and stimulating rectifier and inhibitory channels. However, opposing hypoxia responses of dolphins and chimpanzees exclude simple explanations like cognitive acquisitions. These results have implications for human ischemia, neurodegeneration and the Warburg effect.

Broad Areas of Webinar - including diverse contributions of friends, family, mentors, peers and collaborators

(1)Neurosciences: from basics to selections from the ongoing revolution. From basics, methods, cells, neurons, glia, organelles, energetics, action potentials (AP) to Hyperinteraction & Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) for brain to brain (B2B) communications.

(2)Stresses or genotoxic shock & responses to it including in the Brain.

(3)In the response to genotoxic including respiratory stress, the role played by neurons, glial support cells, mitochondria, immune system modulation of the gut-brain axis under conditions of neuronal homeostasis and/or neuropathological conditions.

(4)Our results in ‘Comparative evolutionary analysis of the neurophysiological and molecular basis of anoxia resistant turtle and hypoxia sensitive mammalian brains to identify oxygen responsive targets in neurodevelopment’. How do our results fit into contemporary perspectives in the neurosciences?

(5)Those who fostered in us a sense of the Public Interest or Common Good and ethical compunctions. Reasons for the foundation of our institute the LSINJ, it’s existence, diversity & continued promotion of it’s core mission – preemption of genetic diseases and birth defects.


Video-16thWeb.LSINJ.NallasethFS.9.5.2020c.mp4

OUTLINE OF RELATION BETWEEN WEBINARS 17 & 18

LSINJ Webinar 17 on 3rd October 2020:

Conceptual Foundation of the core mission of the LSINJ in preempting genetic disease lesions:

Switching the paradigm in medicine from managem-ent of genetic lesions & their pathology(s) to preemption!

(I) Foundation of the core mission of the LSINJ in preempting genetic disease lesions emerging from our work on the Evolutionary Genetics of Speciation, Genetic Regulation of Chromosome (Genome) Biology, Sex Determination and Gametogenesis.

(II) Why preemption complements rather than subsumes contemporary approaches translational and precision medicine, including CRISPR/Cas9-Pam, Stem Cell & Gene Therapy?

(III) Published papers - Synopsis Of relevant books in preparation.

LSINJ Webinar 18 on 7th November 2020: Our data and results in addition to ~100 years of results for the conceptual foundation of the core mission of the LSINJ:

Dissecting physiologically & developmentally relevant genetic regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with murine interspecific backcrosses, Y chromosomes, unstable inverted repeat (IR) in Sxr-regions (spanning Sry loci), sex reversal phenotypes, mammalian Oris, HJ-STR complexes & zDNA.

(i) Application of evolutionary genetics of speciation to systematizing, surveilling & controlling chromosome (genome) biology with mouse interspecific genomes x Y chromosomes inducing instability & Y chromosome wide alterations in epigenetic modifications of repetitive sequences, including, in GATA/GACA-rich Sxr-regions (spanning Sry-loci) correlated with dysregulated mouse sex determination & gametogenesis as reporters.

(ii) Eliciting biochemical, genetic, cellular & molecular mechanisms or factors regulating Recombination-Replication-Repair (RRR) systems in yeast including the HJ – STR complex, mammalian Oris & left handed zDNA sequences.

References:

Shifting the therapeutic paradigm in medicine from post mutational (& pathological) intervention to preemption – a synopsis of the ‘nuts and bolts’ Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, MOJ Proteomics Bioinform. 2019;8(2):41‒43.

Is There a Role for an Evolutionary Genetics Based Rational Health Policy In Global Biomedical, Health and Economic Policies? Nallaseth. J. Mol Biol OMIC

What is the Life Sciences Institute of New Jersey? Why and how does it exist? What are its goals? Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, Mol Biol OMIC 2015, 4: 3, (2168 - 9547 - 1000130.php?aid=60692)

(17) Dr. Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, Webinar October 3rd 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Founding President, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Scientific Officer (CSO), Chief Financial Office (CFO) & Principal Donor;

Member of Working Group in LSINJ: (section in this website on Board Members)

External affiliations: (section in this website on Board Members)

Title: Abstract Switching from management of genetic lesions and their pathology(s) to preempting them – a sketch!

Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, Life Sciences Institute of New Jersey, Belle Mead, NJ 08502.

Various studies have placed the numbers of disease pathology(s) with either genetic or genetic and environmental etiology as greater than 65% of all evaluated diseases and annual costs of hundreds of trillions of dollars. It is impossible to quantify the neurobiological and social impact of the most intractable and dehumanizing of diseases on individuals, families and communities. For convenience genetic diseases can be clearly delineated into events preceding and following the insertion of their causative genetic lesions into the genome as shown below:

(1) networks of genes maintaining & repairing genomes fail -> (2) insertion of genetic lesion -> (3) disease pathology manifested (only after additional factors are contributed)

We illustrate these points with the recent successful Gene Therapy of Sickle Cell Anemia in humans while contrasting its advantages and disadvantage as well as those of similar therapies. The current paradigm in medicine is based on immediate short term therapeutic intervention e.g. Gene Therapy, which are exclusively restricted to step 3. This is often when, due to the intractable nature of the disease, it is too late. Most of the fundamental and defining work on genetic mechanisms from step 1 leading to step 2 is done in simple Model Organisms where the necessary scientific basis and technical methods are available. However, by themselves none of these results and methods can lead to preempting step 2 in humans.

Step 2 occurs when genes for maintenance or repair of specific target genes (or general groups of sequences, loci, chromosomes and genomes) with which they are co-evolved are uncoupled or fail to function. Mechanisms and components collectively inserting mutations in the genome constitute the Mutome. Elucidating the failure of co-evolved genes and so the molecules, mechanisms, and processes leading to step 2 requires a relevant system for generating them. This system emerges from a well-established principle governing evolutionary genetics of speciation. Namely that when genomes of 2 species A and B are combined by mating into an interspecific genome A + B in the lab or field the frequencies of a broad spectrum of genetic lesions underlying several traits are significantly elevated.

Species A x Species B -> A + B genome -> (high frequency/broad spectrum) genetic lesions

This result is illustrated by our work on the destabilization of the mouse Y chromosome, its sex determining region (Sxr) and gene/locus (Sry) by combining them with interspecific genomes (Nallaseth, 1992; Nallaseth and Guo, 2011; Nallaseth et al, 2012, 2016). The genetic lesions underlying an array of traits such as sterility, inviability, XY female sex reversal, coat color variation and anemia may reveal associated lesions identified by ‘panning’ with methods of low level resolution. This contrasts with conventional high resolution targeting and selection of mutant phenotypes which do not reveal the serendipitous processes underlying the insertion of genetic disease lesions.

The application of this principle first in the Discovery Phase and then in the Analytical Phase with the power of high resolution contemporary methods allows the identification of relevant genetic networks, molecules and mechanisms failing in step 1 and leading to step 2 which together constitute the Combinatorial Approach surveilling and controlling the Mutome. For conceptual, scientific and technical reasons the mouse is the Model Organism of choice for initiating these studies. The emergent results can then be transposed to and applied in humans. The Combinatorial Approach depends on the application of a wide spectrum of principles and methods. In the Discovery Phase these include the application of lower to midlevel resolution with principles and methods of evolutionary genetics of speciation, SNPs, Haplotype Maps and Comparative sequencing. Arrays of defined mouse genomes and classical genetics can identify linkages structural and functional relationships of dysfunctional genes and loci with increasingly greater resolution using feral species, Inbred Strains, Consomic Strains, Recombinant Inbred Strains, Collaborative Cross Strains, etc... Informed by the specific nature of lesions identified in the Discovery Phase higher resolution methods of analyses can be incorporated into the Analytical Phase. They include, physico-chemical-biology, nanoscale to attoscale processes and sensors, OMICs, Mass Spectra, optonics, photonics, spectronics, laser/atomic tweezers, graphene biosensor applications, 3D cultures of spheroids/organoids, radiowaves, wireless, fibre optics, Artificial Intelligence and supercomputers. A broad schematic diagram or a Flow chart of this overview of the Combinatorial Approach could be:

(1)PREPARATIVE ORGANIZATIONAL PHASE <-> -> (2) INITIATION OF PARALLEL AND MULTIDIRECTIONAL DISCOVERY PHASE (MICE) <-> -> (3) SUPER-COMPUTATION <-> -> (4) OVERLAPPING, PROGRESSION INTO, PARALLEL AND MULTIDIRECTIONAL ANALYTICAL PHASE <-> -> (5) SUPER-COMPUTATION <-> -> (6) OPERATIONAL PHASE IN MICE (7) TRANSLATION OF RESULTS AND SYSTEMS TO HUMANS <-> -> (8) SUPER-COMPUTATION <-> -> (9) OPERATIONAL PHASE IN HUMANS <-> -> (10) PREEMPTION OF GENETIC DISEASE LESIONS.

These steps will lead to the systematization, surveillance and control of the networks of genes maintaining and repairing the human genome in real time which is required for preempting genetic disease lesions in humans. It will bring the indispensable shift in the current paradigm in medicine from post mutational management of pathology to preemption of diseases. Although the scientific, technical, conceptual, ethical and economic challenges facing the Combinatorial Approach are daunting they are not insurmountable. It is the Culture of Science that remains the single most significant barrier to even initiating this endeavor with all the enormity of its impact for the Public Interest. The underlying and implicit principles of unknown variables, scale, scope, dynamics, and nature, non-targeting and imprecision of the Combinatorial Approach are reflected in other similarly large undertakings that are resolved by Artificial Intelligence and supercomputers and that are currently underway. These include (1) next generation sequencing (NGS) and mapping of Connectomes of the Brain in the Life Sciences, (2) the discovery of Sub-atomic Particles in Particle Accelerators (e.g. Fermi Accelerators and the Large Hadron Collider) in the Physical Sciences, and (3) the exploration of Space.


VideoB-17thWeb.LSINJ.NallasethFS.10.03.2020.mp4
VideoA-17thWeb.LSINJ.NallasethFS.10.03.2020.mp4

(18) Dr. Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, Webinar 18, November 14th 2020

Position and Role in LSINJ: Founding President, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chief Scientific Officer (CSO), Chief Financial Office (CFO) & Principal Donor;

Member of Working Group in LSINJ: (section in this website on Board Members)

External affiliations: (section in this website on Board Members)

Position and Role in LSINJ: For more on Dr. Ferez S. Nallaseth, see the attachments and visit the LSINJ BM section on the site: https://www.lifesciencesinstitutenj.com/board-members, https://sites.google.com/site/nallasethfs/home/pdf-documents , https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Ferez_Nallaseth as well as his Profile on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/today/author/ferez-soli-nallaseth-m-s-ph-d-3112a714

Interests: Core Areas: Evolutionary Genetics of Speciation inducing dysfunctional regulation of Chromosome and Genome Biology; DNA recombination; DNA replication; Sex Determination; Speciation; Ancillary Areas: Neurophysiological and molecular basis of anoxia resistance in turtle brains; Structure/function and expression of Proteins from heterologous hosts; Multi-cue induction of skin morphogenesis in vitro; Overview in Life Sciences: Genetics (Somatic Cell, Mitochondrial, Yeast and Mouse (Epigenetics), Biochemistry and {Molecular, Stem/Cellular, Developmental, Cancer, Chromosome/Genome, Structural, Reproductive (Sex Determination and Gametogenesis) and Evolutionary (Speciation, Protein/Nucleotide Divergence)} Biology, Neurobiology, Virology and Microbiology (Microbial - Evolution, Ecology, Genetics).

Abstract

Our data and results in addition to ~100 years of results for the conceptual foundation of the core mission of the LSINJ:

Systematization of the regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with evolutionary genetics & OMICs: A synopsis.

(Dissecting physiologically & developmentally relevant genetic regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with murine interspecific backcrosses, Y chromosomes, unstable direct and inverted repeat (DR & IR) sequences in ~200 kb Sxr-regions (spanning Sry loci), sex reversal phenotypes, mammalian Oris, HJ-STR complexes & zDNA structures.)

(i) Application of evolutionary genetics of speciation to systematizing, surveilling & controlling chromosome (genome) biology with mouse interspecific genomes x Y chromosomes inducing instability & Y chromosome wide alterations in epigenetic modifications of repetitive sequences, including, in the ~200 kb GATA/GACA-rich Sxr-regions (spanning Sry-loci) correlated with dysregulated mouse sex determination & differentiation as reporters.

(ii) Eliciting biochemical, genetic, cellular & molecular mechanisms or factors regulating Recombination-Replication-Repair (RRR) systems in yeast including the HJ – STR complex, mammalian Oris & left handed zDNA sequences.

Systematization of the regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with evolutionary genetics & OMICs: A synopsis.

(Dissecting physiologically & developmentally relevant genetic regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with murine interspecific backcrosses, Y chromosomes, unstable direct and inverted repeat (DR & IR) sequences in ~200 kb Sxr-regions (spanning Sry loci), sex reversal phenotypes, mammalian Oris, HJ-STR complexes & zDNA structures.)

These results led to the establishment of the conceptual foundations of the LSINJ. They constitute the very basis for switching paradigms from exclusive management of pathology(s) to including preemption of genetic diseases which is the core and legal mission of the LSINJ. These results and principles were presented in LSINJ Webinar 17 which is recorded and posted on the LSINJ website section on webinars:

Switching from management of genetic lesions and their pathology(s) to preempting them – a sketch!

Of significance webinars 17 and 18 define the core mission, as well as the very process that led to the founding of the LSINJ. Webinar 18 is a webinar in which our work showed the instability of the mouse Y chromosome (including the Sxr-region, the sex determining Sry locus) in interspecific genomes. This finding was based on the known conceptual relationships of evolutionary genetics of speciation and genetic regulation of chromosome (and genome) biology scored with phenotypes of sex determination in the literature as well as in our data. We also analyzed related specific genetic, epigenetic, as well as mechanisms of DNA, recombination, replication and repair in model organisms

References:

(1) Shifting the therapeutic paradigm in medicine from post mutational (& pathological) intervention to preemption – a synopsis of the ‘nuts and bolts’ Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, MOJ Proteomics Bioinform. 2019; 8(2):41‒43.

(2) Is There a Role for an Evolutionary Genetics Based Rational Health Policy In Global Biomedical, Health and Economic Policies? Nallaseth. J. Mol Biol OMIC

(3) What is the Life Sciences Institute of New Jersey? Why and how does it exist? What are its goals? Ferez S. Nallaseth, MS, PhD, Mol Biol OMIC 2015, 4: 3, (2168 - 9547 - 1000130.php?aid=60692)

Title Webinar 18: Systematization of the regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with evolutionary genetics & OMICs: A synopsis.

(Dissecting physiologically & developmentally relevant genetic regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with murine interspecific backcrosses, Y chromosomes, unstable direct & inverted repeat (DR & IR) sequences in ~200 kb Sxr-regions (spanning Sry loci), sex reversal phenotypes, mammalian Oris, HJ-STR complexes & zDNA structures.)

These results led to the establishment of the conceptual foundations of the LSINJ. They constitute the very basis for switching paradigms from exclusive management of pathology(s) to including preemption of genetic diseases which is the core and legal mission of the LSINJ. These results and principles were presented in LSINJ Webinar 17 which is recorded and posted on the LSINJ website section on webinars:

Title Webinar - 17: Switching from management of genetic lesions and their pathology(s) to preempting them – a sketch!

Of significance webinars 17 and 18 define the core mission, as well as the very process that led to the founding of the LSINJ. Webinar 18 is a webinar in which our work showed the instability of the mouse Y chromosome (including in the 200 kb Sxr-region spanning the sex determining Sry locus) in interspecific genomes. This finding was based on the known conceptual relationships of evolutionary genetics of speciation and genetic regulation of chromosome (and genome) biology scored with phenotypes of sex determination in the literature as well as in our data. We also analyzed related specific genetic, epigenetic, as well as mechanisms of DNA, recombination, replication and repair in model organisms.

In keeping with the history of these data we copy links to their presentations at various conferences or publications of results in various journals, below.

Dissecting physiologically & developmentally relevant genetic regulation of mammalian chromosome biology with murine interspecific backcrosses, Y chromosomes, unstable direct and inverted repeat (DR & IR) sequences in ~200 kb Sxr-regions (spanning Sry loci), sex reversal and differentiation phenotypes as markers:

(1) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo3MzljZjI2ZWM3NGNlODAw

(2) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo1YWJiNzQ3ZjhiMGJiMjU

(3) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo2MGNlMDAzMTdjOWQxMjYz

(4) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDoyMjdjNGZkOWJiMTUwODNh

(5) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo0YmI2YThlNzNlOTUxMGM3

(6) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDpjNDhiMzcyYmQ0MzUwNw

(7) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDpmODBmNTc2NjIxYWIxY2Y

(8) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo2NmFjNjY2MGQ3ODk2NzY5

Chromosome and Genome Biology (DNA replication, recombination and repair), mammalian Oris, HJ-STR complexes & zDNA structures:

(1) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDoyY2ZiYTI2OGFmNDc0N2Q0

(2) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo1MmU3YjgxMGFhY2Q1Zjg3

(3)https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDoyMDY4ZDU4NTNlN2RiY2Nh

(4) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/8151772/

(5) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDpmMzFiODg5NDM3OGVjMzY

(6) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo1OTRiMDI3Y2VmMjg4YzE3

(7) https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxuYWxsYXNldGhmc3xneDo2MThkZGViZjU1ZDFiNjk1

VideoWeb18.PtA(1-41).mp4
VideoWeb18.PtB(35-52).mp4
VideoWeb18.PtB(35-52).mp4
VideoWeb18.PtC(52-164).mp4

(19A) VP Ralph Sherman 98th Birthday Commemoration - Organized by VP Prof. Lori McGrew

Abstract:

Recently VP Ralph Sherman and his family celebrated his 98th birthday and he shared news of the occasion with us at the webinar on 10/3/2020. Prof. Nirmali Wijegoonawardana was primarily responsible for noting that Ralph played an active role in not only supporting all of the LSINJ activities over the last 2 years. For example Ralph is an enthusiastic and informed participant in all the webinars given by Board Members.

We are fortunate to have someone who is as accomplished as Ralph is, playing the role that he plays for us. And that he continues to do so past his 98th birthday.

Allow me the liberty of having us celebrate this happy day for Ralph and us - perhaps either immediately before or after webinar-19. There are celebratory things that can be said and done online. Ralph’s family David Sherman, Sherri Simmons and Albert Sherman have all agreed to participate in this event.

RalphShermanBirthdayFi.2.12.2020.ppt.pptx
Video-Web19A.LSINJ.ShRa98thLM.12.12.20.mp4

(19B) Director Percy Ichchaporia, M.Sc. M.BioTech.

Title: Three undertakings: Open Innovation, Immunoassays and the biological characterization of cell wall degrading enzyme(s) in plants.

Abstract: (uploaded below)

PercyIchchaporiaCombAbst.12.12.2020-1.doc

(19B) Director Percy Ichchaporia, M.Sc. M.BioTech. contd

Position and Role in LSINJ: Director of Bioinformatics and Computational Analyses, and Biotechnology

Interests: Biotechnology Professional assisting and supporting PhD Scientists in Agricultural science, Bio-tech research, Bio-processing, Bio-Informatics; Mycology and Plant Pathology; Bioinformatics in Cellular and Microbial Biology in Plants and Animals

BioPic: For more on BM Ichchaporia, see the attachments and visit the LSINJ BM section on the site:

Websites: https://www.lifesciencesinstitutenj.com/board-members, https://www.iqvia.com/ ; https://www.linkedin.com/in/percy-ichchaporia-3582a912 ; https://www.linkedin.com/school/deakin-university/


Video-Web19B.LSINJ.IchchapP.12.12.20.mp4

(20) Prof. Lori McGrew, Ph.D. Webinar March 27th 2021


Title: Zebrafish as a model for anxiety

Position and Role in LSINJ: Vice President for Executive Decisions

Interests: Neuropharmacology, anxiety disorders, depression, cannabinoids, herbal medicine, education, and public health

BioPic: https://www.lifesciencesinstitutenj.com/board-members#h.xui6jzx0y175

Abstract:

Zebrafish are an increasingly valuable model organism for pharmacologic and behavioral research. Zebrafish have well characterized behaviors that have been cataloged for use in assessment of spatial learning, anxiety, depression and other measures. In addition, pharmaceutical treatment of zebrafish can be accomplished by immersion, a low-stress drug delivery method. While significant homology exists between zebrafish and humans, some differences exist that may limit their utility as a model for serotonergic signaling. Specifically, the serotonin transporter and an important autoreceptor (5-HT1A) are duplicated in the zebrafish genome and the effect of this duplication on the serotonergic system is not entirely clear. The current studies are designed to add to the growing body of evidence concerning the behavioral effect of manipulating 5-HT and other biogenic amines. In order to accomplish this, zebrafish were treated with the SSRIs, citalopram and escitalopram, along with the triple reuptake inhibitor, 5-APB, and the monoamine releasing agent, BMPEA. The fish were then evaluated for changes in spatial learning, movement and anxiety by using a T-maze or novel dive tank. While there was no significant effect of SSRI treatment on spatial learning, there were significant decreases in movement and in body length for the SSRI treated groups. There were also significant decreases in movement and apparent anxiety in the 5-APB and BMPEA treated groups. These results are consistent with previous reports showing that increases in 5-HT that produce an anxiolytic effect both in zebrafish and in humans and support the value of continuing to cultivate this model.

Video-20thWeb.LSINJ.McGrewL.3.27.2021.mp4